Thursday, September 24, 2015

Film Week

A decade ago, when I started this blog, Film Week was on Tuesdays. Then, because of scheduling with my college classes, I ended up moving it to Wednesday. Today, because of scheduling with my wife's work and my therapy, I'm moving it to Thursday for the foreseeable future.

CARRY ON SCREAMING! (1966)
Another cute, hit-or-miss Carry On movie, and once again, Kenneth Williams is the best part. God damn, that man makes me laugh. I've read that he privately didn't care for these movies and considered them beneath him, but he can sell the silliness better than anyone else in the cast. Some of the most groan-worthy puns I've ever heard in my life, but I had a fun time. **1/2

22 JUMP STREET (2014)
Undeniably funny in spots, but it has the same problems as the first movie, just magnified and with more money--too big, too slick, and overlong. Also, I think with this movie it's becoming obvious that going meta is becoming another cliche. The jokes about sequels and the constant commentary on formula and comedy in action franchises would have been clever eight years ago, but is labored and tiresome here. (And they spend a lot of time on it, to the point where it's often the whole joke.) To be fair, the end credits montage of endless Jump Street sequels is hilarious. Channing Tatum is still the funniest part of these movies. **1/2

PIERROT LE FOU (1965)
Jean-Paul Belmondo leaves his bourgeois life and family behind to embark on a life of drifting and crime with a friend's younger niece (Anna Karina). Godard is hit or miss for me; I either find his films fascinating or tedious. This one, I found tedious. I like the way it looks and the gorgeous colors, with its pop art style, but I found the postmodern attempts of the narrative precious and somewhat empty. Lots of style, but the substance is lacking, although Anna Karina is always compelling. **1/2

1 comment:

Tallulah Morehead said...

I have Carry On Screaming on DVD. I love it. And I've read Kenneth Williams's diaries. He thought EVERYTHING was beneath him.